The act of remembering, and sharing, transcends the past. Our present journey becomes imbued with a surety of who we are, and what we can achieve.

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I was born in 1923 during the British Raj in India. Calcutta was a city of 10 million people. The Jewish community numbered three thousand, nestled within a Hindu/Muslim population oblivious to the uniqueness of this tiny community.

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The journey to Jerusalem was something glorious – in the hills surrounding Jerusalem I found my first joy. More than joy – I understood then the feeling with which King David wrote his Psalms, especially the lines in which he tells of ‘hills frisking like young lambs’. It seemed very possible from the train!

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Whereas I had been raised on the Indian subcontinent during the British Raj, and had spent the last twelve years in the tiny British Mandatory territory of Palestine/Israel, we had now landed on a new island continent greatly influenced by its British heritage. This was a ‘boutique’ country, with a small population and an abundance of beauty and natural wealth.

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To have the ability and time to both remember and record one’s own life journey is precious. But the upshot of this process is what truly matters. The sum total of every nuance of my existence is the insight that I have gained into living. It is a simple legacy – always be willing to give of yourself!